How I Use OneNote

image

Figure 1 – My Technology notebook showing multiple sections

Thank you to the folks that have emailed me and asked me how I use OneNote in my daily work. 

I am happy to answer that question.  OneNote has a tiered organizational system that begins with notebooks, and divides the notebook into sections, and then lets you record notes in each section by page.

I have several notebooks.  However, the one that I use the most is my TECHNOLOGY notebook.  You can see how I break down the sections in Figure 1 above.

Below, in Figure 2, is a sample of the section – Dynamics GP – and an illustration of the different pages that I have in that section.

image

Figure 2 – Sample of pages from my section on Dynamics GP in OneNote

Everyone will arrange their information differently.  This is the arrangement that works for me.  Why I like OneNote so much is that it is online, and I can pull it up from any of my devices, or from a browser at a client site.  While it is easy to say that one should remember all the things that you have done on a software, I have learned that if you only do something once a year, sometimes you need to go back and look at the steps and rules.  I am often changing my pages because process and steps get updated during the passing of the year, either because the software was updated or because of third party add-ons that change the process.

Why I love working with OneNote

1) With OneNote Clipper, I can take articles or information from the internet and store it until I am ready to clean it up and add it to my notebook.

2)  If I am working on a research project, I can create a notebook for the research, copy it in, and then categorize it, and then wipe it out when I am done.

3) I don’t use them often, but the drawing tools are pretty good and let me create quick work flows or mind maps.

4) I love the fast SEARCH function.

5) The VIEW toolbar lets me pin my OneNote info so it is easy to get at.  See Figure 3.

image

Figure 3 – The VIEW Toolbar in OneNote, highlighting the DOCK to DESKTOP feature

As with starting anything new, using OneNote does require some practice and you may not get it right the first time.  I didn’t. The trick is to wipe it out and to start over until you get it right for the way that you work.

More on OneNote

Note: use CTRL+Click to go to sites

OneNote for Beginners
Insert online videos into OneNote 2016 for Windows
New Features Added to OneNote
How To Move from Evernote to OneNote
New Features in OneNote At January 2016

New Features Added to OneNote

image

Figure 1 – Graphic from https://www.onenote.com/clipper

As you know, if you read my blog, I am a fan of OneNote.  One of the reasons I am a fan is that in Dynamics NAV, you can send information from NAV to OneNote.

The features that Microsoft  added in July are making me an avid supporter of OneNote.  The first feature is INK EFFECTS.  The feature allows users to jazz up  notes and drawings with new ink effects like rainbow, galaxy, gold and silver to make anything that is  written is more unique and even more fun.

The second feature is OneNote Web Clipper.  The information below comes from https://blogs.office.com/2016/07/21/onenote-july-roundup.

Our OneNote Web Clipper is better than ever. We have a number of new features on our Web Clipper for Chrome, Safari, and IE to give you more control over your screen clippings before you send it into OneNote.

Preview—Ever wonder exactly what was about to show up in OneNote once you clipped? Problem solved! Now all clipping modes—full page, region, article, recipe and product—provide a preview so what you see is what you get.

YouTube and Vimeo support—You can now clip videos from YouTube and Vimeo pages into OneNote.

Highlight text—When you clip an article, product or recipe you can highlight sections of text, and those highlights will be saved to OneNote.

Clip multiple regions in one go—Clip multiple regions of a webpage and save them all in a single OneNote page.

Use your own title—Change the title of your page in the preview window before sending it to OneNote.

Articles your way—Change the font size and type in your article to improve readability before you even clip it to OneNote.

Update to the latest version to see all the new features or download the extension at www.onenote.com/clipper.

I love the web clipper and have it on my Chrome browser.  I use it almost every day to clip and pop information into my OneNote. I use it to keep track of things I think might be good information  in a blog. Smile

How To Move from Evernote to OneNote

image

Image from https://www.onenote.com/import-evernote-to-onenote

I have used OneNote for a long time.  However, because it was easier to link in Evernote, I kept some important stuff in Evernote since I could access it from my iPad or from my Samsung phone. 

Microsoft has been making it very easy for us to switch everything to OneNote because OneNote is now so accessible from any device.  I wanted to see how easy.

Using the Microsoft OneNote Import Tool

I downloaded the importer, and I let it chug.

It immediately found my Evernote – but just the one. I have two Evernote accounts so I thought it might find both of them.

image

Image from import tool

As I continued, I received the message below telling me how the content will be organized.

image

Image from import tool – Evernote to OneNote

The import to OneNote happens quite quickly.

image

Image from the import tool – how the content from Evernote is moving.

When the import was complete, I did get the SUCCESS message below.  (I love this!)

image

Image from the import saying that I am successful

However, it actually took about twenty minutes for all my notes to import. 

I downloaded the Android App for OneNote while I was doing the move between Evernote and OneNote.  I was surprised that all of the notebooks were up on my phone before they were fully imported according to my desktop.  It did put each of my folders into different notebooks which is a bit confusing at first. 

If you switch to OneNote from Evernote, let me know how it goes for you.

Cheers!

New Features in OneNote At January 2016

image

Figure 1 – Image comes from https://blogs.office.com from the OneNote Whats New In January 2016 article

I was delighted to read that OneNote is getting a facelift.  The Microsoft Office team has announced the new features available in January 2016 in their blog https://blogs.office.com/2016/01/29/onenote-whats-new-in-january-2016/.

For those of you that want to see features only, here they are.

  • Insert shapes on Mac
  • Search all OneDrive notebooks on Mac and iOS
  • Publish notebooks publicly on Docs.com
  • Me-me-me-me (at work, works!)
  • Crop shop
  • Forget-me-now
  • Firefox and Safari users rejoice—clip with abandon
  • Office Lens built in

I hope that these titles intrigue you so much that you go and read the blog. :0

Remember, if you are a passionate OneNote user, you can make suggestions about the features that you would like to see.  Use this link:

Suggestions: OneNote UserVoice

Details on Learning Tools for OneNote

image

Figure 1 – Picture from http://blogs.office.com

The Microsoft Office blogs has more information on OneNote Learning Tools.  You can read more at https://blogs.office.com/2016/01/19/learning-tools-for-onenote-improves-learning-for-all/.

Here is what I consider relevant:

Download the Learning Tools for OneNote public preview version today at onenote.com/learningtools.

We designed reading and writing solutions that leverage what works for people with learning differences and for other users based upon research. We are delivering a mainstream tool that benefits all students; it is a great example of inclusive design because it builds on solutions for people with learning differences but it works for everyone and is non-stigmatizing. This matters for students and educators for a few key reasons:

  1. Our ability to read impacts our ability to learn and our lifelong earning potential.
  2. OneNote is growing, and educators are advocating for OneNote because it helps students get organized and gain their independence.
  3. Most importantly, Microsoft can improve learning outcomes through enhanced reading and writing tools.